S1E03 - The Wrath of Dark Kat

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Re: S1E03 - The Wrath of Dark Kat

Post by Prettyshadowj26 » Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:20 pm

SwatKatsFan1 wrote:I think I might know why Feral wanted to take on Dark Kat personally and not allow the SWAT Kats or his ex-Enforcers or his Enforcers to get in the way. It's because Dark Kat might have killed someone close to him probably to gain powers from an evil god or demon. In my fanfic world, Dark Kat murdered Feral's partner Lieutenant Will Weston and Feral felt guilty since he wasn't there that night to save his comrade back when he was a sergeant. Feral ended up having to adopt Will's infant son Jerome who works at the Enforcers Detective division who he doesn't get along with very well which is hilarious. :lol:
I'll tell Why ? Feral wants to show everyone that he can Handle super villains by himself

After all he is indeed The most Power-Hungry chief of the Enforcers guess that explain why he knocked Chance & Jake's jet during their enforcers days
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Re: S1E03 - The Wrath of Dark Kat

Post by Kooshmeister » Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:53 pm

I disagree with Feral being power hungry. Yes, he's described that way in the promotional material and there's some evidence of this in the early episodes, but this aspect of his character was dropped pretty quickly and most of Feral's negative traits (outside of the flashback in this episode) were transferred over to Steel. SteeleSweatDropIcon
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Re: S1E03 - The Wrath of Dark Kat

Post by marhawkman » Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm

Ocelot wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:34 am
The writing for Callie is just terrible after rewatching this. Not only for how she treats Feral but the Enforcers in general. She basically buries them in the opening by saying the Swat Kats are better.

She is the deputy Mayor. She should have respect for the kats and she kats who put their lives on the line to save the city everyday.

I compare the writing here to two other shows around this time Batman Tas and Gargoyles. Both those shows did a much better job when it came to writing the police officers in the show.
This is a gripe I had when watching the show as a teen actually. The Enforcers get written as ANTAGONISTS... just... because. The SWAT Kats are vigilantes, and.... the show needs them to have a reason to not be Enforcers.

Non-villainous antagonists need to be written VERY carefully. They can't be actual villains, but they have to oppose the heroes for some reason.

And Callie is, for some reason I don't think we ever got a proper explanation for, to be on the side of the SWAT Kats. Honestly, I think it's her biggest character flaw. She doesn't trust the Enforcers.

But on the flip side, we know Feral has his job for a reason. T-Bone and Razor WERE being reckless when they were Enforcers. Ooh, also, there's one tidbit about Dark Kat that is super-easy to miss. That encounter where Jake and Chance take a shot at him? that WASN'T Dark Kat's first battle with Ulysses Feral! That raises a LOT of questions that we don't have answers to.
Ocelot wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:51 pm
marhawkman wrote: Which is weird, because this episode also establishes that the SK jet is made out of "military salvage"... IE the SKs recycling peices of broken Enforcer jets
Are the Enforcers the Military? Because I always thought of them as just the city police. While the military or Army is completely separate. Hence why the Swat Kats have better equipment then the enforcers.
That's an interesting question about the setting. The Enforcers have a bunch of stuff you wouldn't expect actual Police to have. Armed aircraft of several kinds, armored vehicles to include TANKS.

It's not clear if this is a proper military. We never see them act outside city, but.... we see very little outside the city in general. We know they have a seaport, and an AIRCRAFT CARRIER! Also, there's that ambiguous war thing. WHO was in the war?

I often compare the setting to Judge Dredd now. It's a future post-apocalyptic setting, not modern-day. As a kid seeing it I didn't really get the Dredd setting, but... found it very interesting. And looking back now? yeah... massive similarities. How much.... civilization is there outside city limits? In fact, we only see at one point a non-Kat being from Earth. That Hyena guy. How close IS the nearest major population center?
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Re: S1E03 - The Wrath of Dark Kat

Post by Kooshmeister » Wed Nov 08, 2023 4:31 am

marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
This is a gripe I had when watching the show as a teen actually. The Enforcers get written as ANTAGONISTS... just... because.
Kinda...?

Ignoring a few comments about the Enforcers being "late as usual," they're mostly depicted neutrally. The Enforcers in general don't seem to be who Callie has a problem with, but rather Feral himself and especially Steel (despite Callie's undisguised dislike for Feral, she clearly considers him better to run the Enforcers than Steel, who she flat-out says is a threat to the city if he's left in charge for too long). The extent to which she dislikes Feral and is unwilling to really give him any leeway tends to vary from episode to episode. See, for instance, the scene in The Metallikats when Manx worriedly says no one's better than Feral, and Callie says she hopes so, for their sakes. And in The Pastmaster Always Rings Twice, she says with the SWAT Kats gone, it's up to Feral to save the city. Not exactly a ringing endorsement, but Callie is capable of swallowing her dislike of Feral if he's literally the only option the city has for a savior. I think this is because for Callie, the ends always justify the means, and if the guy she doesn't like very much is the only one for the job, then so be it.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
Non-villainous antagonists need to be written VERY carefully. They can't be actual villains, but they have to oppose the heroes for some reason.
This I definitely agree with. I've always had a problem with how Feral was portrayed. Well, not portrayed, exactly, but how the show treats him, and it's frankly a bit schizophrenic; which is to say what Feral says and does don't always match up with what we're told he's like. At worst, he's got a short temper and sees the world as very black and white with no room for moral ambiguity; all criminals are equal in his eyes, deserving of being ground under the righteous heels of the city's true protectors, the Enforcers. His problem with the SWAT Kats, while never flat-out said, seems to be that (besides the fact they operate outside the law) they're recklessness means they're often just as destructive as the bad guys and the fact they're answerable to no one means they always avoid any meaningful consequences by flying away.

See, for example, Katastrophe; they accidentally blow up Megakat Biochemical Labs and a bunch of stolen bank money (when they blow up the Metallikat Express). Both of these things were accidents. That much is obvious (though the SWAT Kats never admit culpability in either case, framing both incidents as entirely justified and apparently intentional in what seems to have been Glenn Leopold's attempt to prevent having the heroes actually make mistakes). In both cases they leave the area and escape and never face any consequences. Feral doesn't have this luxury. Because he is in a highly visible and public position as Commander of the Enforcers and uses his real name, he has no anonymity to fall back on in the event that he fails to do his job or screws up. This, I think, is the main reason he is so unwilling most of the time to go in guns blazing and damage the very property he's attempting to save, because he knows he'll get in trouble if he does, so he has rules to follow and at least person to answer to that we know of: Manx. And although Manx is a cowardly idiot, he has the authority to make Feral pay for his failures and mistakes if he wants (something he would've done in the original proposed outline for Cry Turmoil, where Feral is fired for accidentally destroying a music hall while trying to catch the SWAT Kats).

It doesn't help that to some extent, Feral is often undermined by his own side. The most obvious example of this is Steel, who clearly wants his superior's job, but there's a few other instances of characters who really should be on Feral's side inexplicably not being. Callie is obvious, but Manx himself often ignores Feral's advice and humiliates him... such as showing no real concern for his broken arm in The Metallikats and telling him to perform the menial task of cleaning up the smashed Metallikat body parts; though it's likely he meant for Feral have his men do it, and not him personally, the way he says it makes it clear he doesn't respect Feral, but, then, he doesn't respect anyone, so maybe the way Manx treats Feral isn't that unusual, after all.

And his own niece Felina, in fact, in addition to being reckless and disobedient, doesn't hide the fact she likes the SWAT Kats and is willing to work with them (often doing so despite direct orders not to), and while Felina is loyal to her uncle and clearly loves him (Lance Falk has said their relationship when they're not on duty is very warm and loving), the fact she disobeys him all the time and frequently runs off to fight alongside two guys he really doesn't like has got to drive him nuts. Add to this the fact he is in an awkward position where his brother is concerned; because of him, he can't fire Felina (or apparently discipline her at all) if he wants to continue having a relationship with his brother. Though I'm probably reading too much into what is really just one random line of dialogue ("My brother would never speak to me again"); it's entirely possible Feral wasn't being literal when he said that, and I'm not suggesting that Felina has ever (intentionally) abused the fact her father's relationship with her uncle would be drastically strained if he were to fire her, but rather that Feral's brother is being the unreasonable one by insisting that if his daughter were to be fired it'd be her uncle's fault for firing her and not her fault for doing something that would get her fired, or that something Feral's brother said or did made Feral think he would.

The final instance of Feral being treated unreasonably by the show is the way the SWAT Kats themselves treat him. Their reason is clearly that they still hold it against him for firing them and sentencing them to work in the salvage yard, and that's fair, but what isn't is the fact they have him at probably the worst disadvantage ever; he doesn't know who they are, so he has no idea why they're always such jerks to him, so what is he supposed to think except that they're just being jerks to be jerks and treat them accordingly...? It's after all flat-out stated in behind the scenes material that not only doesn't Feral know Chance and Jake are the SWAT Kats, the idea never crossed his mind, and if he was told, he wouldn't believe it... meaning the idea that the SWAT Kats are guys he knows under other names isn't something he's ever considered with any seriousness, so them being someone he once wronged has also never crossed his mind, so he has to instead figure out all on his own why these two are always being jerks to him, and since he doesn't know they have a legitimate reason, what else is he supposed to think except that they're just trying to piss him off? They don't treat him with any respect, and he doesn't know why, so he doesn't treat them any better.

Now, the fact he has never considered that Chance and Jake are the SWAT Kats and canonically wouldn't believe anyone if he was told means he he probably would've assumed Mac and Molly were lying in Metal Urgency if he'd actually accepted their offer and been told... but maybe not; even if he was skeptical at first, I wanna say that he'd be smart enough to wonder why Chance and Jake of all people are who the Metallikats said were the SWAT Kats, because, after all, how would they know or even care who these random (to them) "grease monkeys?" I'm not sure they even ever knew Chance and Jake had been former Enforcers, they knew so little about them as individuals when discovering they were the SWAT Kats; meaning that them accusing those two people out of everyone else in Megakat City, despite how unbelievable it might sound, means it's actually more likely they're telling the truth than if they'd accused, say, someone else a bit more prominent in the day to day goings on of the city.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
And Callie is, for some reason I don't think we ever got a proper explanation for, to be on the side of the SWAT Kats. Honestly, I think it's her biggest character flaw. She doesn't trust the Enforcers.
Again, Callie's problem seems to be specifically with the Enforcers' leadership as opposed to the rank and file Enforcers themselves, and, as mentioned, has also at least a few times expressed some faith in Feral's abilities, though only ever when he's the only option that is currently available, and even though she doesn't like him, she clearly at least respects him and think he runs the Enforcers well, as she's never advocated getting rid of him and expressed concern when Steel took command from him after he was captured. Callie may not like Feral, but despite his dislike of the SWAT Kats, they're on the same page: protecting the city is what matters, and guys like Steel who are only out for themselves and utterly incompetent to boot are a dangerous liability. Whatever else Callie thinks of Feral, she's never really questioned his dedication, bravery and commitment to protecting the city, and considers him the best of available bad options to command the Enforcers.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
That encounter where Jake and Chance take a shot at him? that WASN'T Dark Kat's first battle with Ulysses Feral!
I do often wonder why Feral insisted on personally taking down Dark Kat. Pride? Vengeance? Did Big D kill someone he cared about or otherwise humiliate him, making him want to get back at the big purple baddie? That flashback scene is interesting... and frustrating... because Feral never acts that way again (not even in that episode; his demand to personally take out Dark Kat at the end being entirely reasonable, as Big D had held him prisoner for the better part of a day); rather, the way he acts in that scene is one of the only instances where he acts the way he's described in his official character bio in the press kit and other behind the scenes materials. There, he's explicitly described as power hungry and it seems like he was originally set up to be a villain. Him demanding, against all logic, that Chance and Jake back off so he can personally take down the villain lines up with this, but nothing else does.
marhawkman wrote:Are the Enforcers the Military? Because I always thought of them as just the city police. While the military or Army is completely separate. Hence why the Swat Kats have better equipment then the enforcers.

That's an interesting question about the setting. The Enforcers have a bunch of stuff you wouldn't expect actual Police to have. Armed aircraft of several kinds, armored vehicles to include TANKS.
I think the Enforcers are police who frequently find themselves performing the role of the military. Which is to say, while they nominally handle ordinary crimes, the frequency with which the city finds itself threatened means that they've had to militarize themselves. Assuming there is in fact a regular military in whatever country Megakat City is in, I get the distinct impression that they can't always be counted on to arrive quickly for some reason, and that as a consequence, the regular police force has had to drastically restructure itself into a pseudo-military organization to be able to respond to threats immediately rather than having to wait on the regular military because. It's also entirely possible that the military is forbidden by law from operating domestically, meaning they can't deploy to their own cities, sort of like how the Roman military was, for many years, not allowed in certain places in the Roman Empire, including Rome itself, for (perfectly justified) fear that the military's leaders would stage a revolt and take over (which is exactly what ended up happening after Julius Caesar was the first emperor in history to allow the military into Rome, with the express purpose of solidifying his power base and authority by essentially doing what he wasn't supposed to do and daring anyone to stop him, something that has happened, before and since, many times whenever a leader is too buddy-buddy with the military).

The fact the Enforcers have jets and tanks isn't evidence to me that they're military, only that they're militaristic and routinely face threats most other regular police forces don't. After all, it's worth noting that although they do have what might be considered military vehicles, they lack the variety found in actual militaries, i.e. they have just the one kind of tank (leaving the Behemoth aside) and it was not until very nearly the end of the show that they got halftracks, not that show really makes it clear that they've even got them, as they're only seen twice in very brief shots in two episodes (Volcanus Erupts! and Unlikely Alloys, if you're wondering). The Peacekeeper (Enforcer tank) is also not really a very good example of a main battle tank, and honestly looks more like a tracked armored personnel carrier someone stuck a turret and guns on, considering how small and far forward they are, and it doesn't even look like the turret can turn due to the raised sides of the tank. If I had to guess, Feral (or whoever was the Commander before him) asked for tanks, but penny-pinching Manx would only spring for unarmed armored vehicles, and it was only after a big fight that Manx finally agreed to give them actual tanks... but being the usual cheapskate that he is, all he did was have the designers stick a turret with two guns on it on top of the tank and go "There" rather than having an actual tank designed from the ground up.

The Peacekeepers are a late addition, too; they weren't considered until the script for Destructive Nature, which is the first episode they appear in (at least in production order; in airdate order, The Wrath of Dark Kat comes before it). Although they're included in the main models and not episode design, I know for a fact Lance Falk came up with them because the way he describes them in the script, it's written as though this is the first time we're seeing them, and even the name for them is only mentioned as an afterthought ("Let's call them 'Peacekeepers'").

And in the storyboards for that same episode, the Enforcers also have single-tracked armored personnel carriers, which the majority of them arrive in, though these got dropped in the finished version of the episode and the Enforcers arrive in the commonly seen squad cars. This decision is interesting because it means the Enforcers lack something else that most regularly militaries have, and which not having puts them at something of a disadvantage: troop carriers. Although it's clear from the actual show that they have no difficulties in deploying troops (called "Enforcer Commandos" in the model sheets), they're either never seen actually seen arriving and are just "there" or always show up two by two in the squad cars, which seems ridiculously inefficient. So it isn't a huge issue, but just something I've noticed after watching this dang show way too much.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
We never see them act outside city, but.... we see very little outside the city in general.
We see the Enforcers on missions outside the city on multiple occasions. Most notably, in Chaos in Crystal, they fight Rex Shard on a golf course, which is nowhere near Megakat City. According to the script, it's just outside the town of Megakat Springs, which is mentioned in the episode but never seen except for one shot showing the skyline in the distance (although background art not used in the episode shows in great detail how the town is laid out and where exactly it is in relation to the golf course). And in The Deadly Pyramid, the Enforcers are seen flying a chopper squadron near the mountains, which is way, way outside of the city. All of which tells me that their authority, while not limitless, extends at least several miles outside of Megakat City, with them serving surrounding towns and such, likely via substations (small command posts in each area they need to have a presence in, something many real-life police, particularly sheriffs, do actually do (because sheriffs enforce the law in counties, which contain multiple cities or towns, they need multiple stations in each of those towns (often regardless of whether or not the town already has its own police force). Then there's the Megakat City Defense Center in Night of the Dark Kat; it's all by itself in a big wide open area with mountains in the background and powerlines stretching off into the distance as far as the eye can see. How far away from Megakat City it is isn't clear, but I do know that it's close enough for Hard Drive to immediately be there after leaving the Defense Center, but far enough away that it isn't visible in any background shots of the facility.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
We know they have a seaport, and an AIRCRAFT CARRIER!
To be fair, I'm not sure the aircraft carrier is an Enforcer one. It lacks the Enforcer emblem anywhere and all the vehicles on it are not ones the Enforcers actually have in their possession, most notably the Jeep which gets blown to bits; the vehicle lacks anything on it suggesting it's an Enforcer vehicle. There is an Enforcer logo... but it's on a partition behind where the visitors are supposed to sit (and interestingly never do), suggesting the seats, the box they're in and the partition behind them are something brought there and set up for the unveiling of the Blue Manx and not something that is ordinarily aboard. I know a lot of people assume the aircraft carrier belongs to the Enforcers, and I don't blame them; sometimes the simplest explanation is the best, and there's nothing saying it isn't an Enforcer aircraft carrier... but keep in mind there's also nothing saying that it is; annoyingly, The Ghost Pilot is one of the episodes we have very little production material for, so unlike a lot of things, I can't say much for 100% certain with regards to the aircraft carrier or much else in the episode, but what we do have is a lot of background art from it, including the carrier, and the handwritten notes don't specify if it's anything beyond just "aircraft carrier." However, considering we see no one but Feral there (and two commandos guarding the jet later), and considering the Blue Manx is left on the aircraft carrier rather than being parked on the runway at Enforcer Headquarters (where it likely would've been safer, as it's doubtful the Red Lynx would've thought to go there) suggests it does in fact belong to the Enforcers... but if this is true then it's weird we never actually see it being used to deploy aircraft at sea, even when the Enforcers need a seagoing base from which to deploy fighters, such as in Cry Turmoil where they send speedboats (!) to apprehend Turmoil's guards and crew after the Sky-Lion crashes into the sea. It's so weird that Lance Falk totally forgot the aircraft carrier and couldn't seem to think of anything better to give the Enforcers than speedboats. In fairness, it's just one quick scene (to the point I'm not sure most people even remember the speedboats), but still.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
we see very little outside the city in general.
We actually see outside the city plenty. The salvage yard is technically outside the city; the city is in the background behind it across a river (or possibly Megakat Bay) in most shots. As mentioned, the Defense Center is outside the city. Plus both prisons we see, one of which is on an island out in the bay. We also see the mountains (at the base of which is a depot for snow plows, suggesting the mountains get snow, something backed up by the unfinished episode Turmoil 2: The Revenge, in which Turmoil's mountaintop base, the Cloud Fortress, is located in the mountains and there's lots of snow there). We also see a farm which is outside the city limits (there's a sign for the city in front of it), as well as Megakat Swamp and the Dead Forest in the middle of it (where Dr. Viper lives). We don't see much of the swamp either time it appears, but judging from what we see in The Giant Bacteria, the Dead Forest is quite huge. There's also the aforementioned island one of the prisons is on, Alkatraz Island, as well as Anakata Island. The MASA Space Center is also outside of the city (there's nothing but desert around it for miles; this is in keeping with many places like it in real life, where, due to the constant takeoffs and landings, they're usually located as far from any populated areas as is conveniently possible). Heck, Puma-Dyne and the nuclear power plant are outside the city... except when they're not (I'm looking at you, Volcanus Erupts! and Unlikely Alloys!), though to be fair in the latter case, we might not be seeing the same plant each time. Given Megakat City's size, I suspect it requires multiple power generating stations to run itself, and besides, on the sign for the entrance in The Wrath of Dark Kat, it says "Megakat Nuclear Plant No. 12," meaning it's the twelfth of at least twelve different power plants (though for the purposes of simplicity, in my fanfics I always have it be the same power plant so I can use the same group of characters associated with it each time).
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
I often compare the setting to Judge Dredd now.
Definitely. The main similarity for me is the fact the show takes place in "Megakat City." In Judge Dredd, I believe all the cities are called Mega-Cities.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
It's a future post-apocalyptic setting, not modern-day.
Do you mean SWAT Kats or Judge Dredd? Because although you could say SWAT Kats takes place in a post-apocalyptic world, there's nothing in the show itself or anything else that I've come across that suggests such a thing. The weird green skies and advanced technology beyond anything we have even today aside, Megakat City always struck me as being a fairly typical city for the SWAT Kats' world, albeit much larger of course.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
How much.... civilization is there outside city limits?
Plenty. As mentioned, we see plenty of locations that are demonstrably outside the city limits, and there are also characters who come in from outside, such as the three Siamese kat businessmen, who fly in from somewhere else, likely a foreign country. Manx gets Mr. Young (the businessman with the glasses) from the airport in The Ci-Kat-A, and in a scene never animated for Volcanus Erupts!, he and Young were going to escape in a cab, with Manx yelling for the driver to get them to the airport so they can escape (although the scene was deleted, the cab still appears in the background and we see Manx run towards it). And speaking of airports, that passenger jet the SWAT Kats save from crashing in Cry Turmoil had to come from somewhere, and the captain, when preparing to land, says the airport is "Megakat International Airport," meaning it's, well, international, taking both domestic flights from elsewhere in the country as well as foreign flights. Then in Bride of the Pastmaster, there are the two KatCo tankers being attacked by sea monsters; dialogue indicates they were going to Megakat City, not from it, meaning they were bringing oil from somewhere else across the sea ("So that's why no oil tankers have been able to reach Megakat City!"). And this isn't even going into all the characters who are clearly not locals and have different accents from everyone else.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
In fact, we only see at one point a non-Kat being from Earth. That Hyena guy. How close IS the nearest major population center?
Ah, Chopshop. How that pink-haired doofus continues being the frickin' bane of my existence. I'm not sure he's a hyena. I think he's just a kat with an annoying laugh. It doesn't make sense for him to be a hyena. Would they really make the first and only non-kat character who isn't an alien or a monster some random guy the SWAT Kats defeat right away and not the main villain of the episode...? Annoyingly, the creators have utterly refused to give a concrete answer about this one way or another, and, yes, SWAT Kats Unplugged is sadly another episode we don't have much in the way of production material for, or at least we don't have anything which would answer this question once and for all one way or the other. As it is, the only real evidence for him being a hyena is the fact T-Bone calls him "a laughin' hyena." If not for that, I suspect nobody would think he was supposed to be anything but a kat. You can't use his facial structure and mane as evidence for him being a hyena, as many of the other characters have a similar face to him, or outright don't really resemble felines at all except for their pointy ears. Because everyone is the same species, the character designers had to get creative when making sure everyone was an individual, and it seems their solution was to, once they got beyond the main characters, just do whatever to make each character distinct, which ultimately involved giving them a variety of facial structures no actual cats would ever have, but which humans do, the idea apparently being that, if cats did evolve, they'd have just as much variety among them as humans do. And since humans have a wide variety of facial structures, so do the kats. Nobody thinks Dr. Viper isn't a kat because of his long face and huge jawline, which he had even before he got mutated. And although a few people have tried to suggest Steel is a fox due to his narrow, pointy muzzle and sharp features, I've never bought it.

I'm pretty sure that apart from aliens, everyone is a kat. Mostly because even the non-kat aliens (Mutilor and his henchmen aside) have some trait that is feline, such as the fact the Ci-Kat-A have pointy ears and tails, and the Aqueons are basically just kat versions of "Star Trek rubber forehead aliens," being blue kats with odd-looking bony forehead ridges.

And lastly, I don't think T-Bone's line means anything; it's meant to be an insult, not him specifically saying what Chopshop is. Or are we to assume Dr. Viper is in fact part lizard because Feral calls him one, despite the fact he is in fact part snake (I mean, not only is he named Dr. Viper, but it is flat-out said that the mutagen had "viper extract," and a viper is a type of venomous snake)? Viper isn't a lizard regardless of what Feral calls him, and I assume that Chopshop isn't actually a hyena despite the fact T-Bone calls him "a laughin' hyena." I think people are too literal-minded sometimes.

However, as we have no evidence for or against Chopshop being a hyena, I'll concede that I could be wrong and he may actually be one, I just really doubt it for the reasons I've stated.
marhawkman wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2023 5:09 pm
How close IS the nearest major population center?
However far it is from Megakat City to Megakat Springs, which, as mentioned, is a whole town and not just the golf course.
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